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Thread: EASA Emergency AD 2018-0041-E

  1. #1
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    Cool EASA Emergency AD 2018-0041-E

    A busy weekend then for techies and LAEs on A320Neo and A321Neo aircraft with GTF engines.
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: EASA Emergency AD 2018-0041-E

    Over time!
    The Higher the Fewer

  3. #3
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    Default Re: EASA Emergency AD 2018-0041-E

    Yeah. Depairing every aircraft with two affected engines fitted. Could be a nightmare.
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    Default Re: EASA Emergency AD 2018-0041-E

    Alas! It gets worse for Pratt & Whitney as Airbus reacts.

    ATW Online; Saturday 10 February 2018
    Airbus stops accepting PW1100G engines for A320neo aircraft

    Airbus decided to stop accepting additional Pratt & Whitney PW1100G engines equipping its A320neo family aircraft, after a higher than normal number of inflight shutdowns and aborted takeoffs were reported on aircraft using the latest build-standard engines.

    The problem involves the knife-edge seal in the high-pressure compressor aft hub and can potentially appear on engines starting with serial number P770450. 33 aircraft, according to Airbus and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

    Airbus says around one-third of the in-service fleet of A320neos and A321neos has those engines installed so far, 11 of which are understood to have all two engines of the problematic standard and 21 just one of them.

    Pratt & Whitney had no immediate comment on the latest Airbus decision.

    The problem could become much bigger if the engine supplier cannot find a quick fix, as the delivery schedule of future A320neo aircraft will likely be seriously affected in that case.

    The issue is the latest in a string of problems that have bedeviled the GTF program.

    The A320neo’s planned 2015 entry into service was pushed into 2016 because of GTF issues, and both Airbus and Bombardier have blamed Pratt for A320neo-family and CSeries aircraft delivery delays as Pratt & Whitney struggled to ramp up production as fast as needed and as fixes to address reliability and durability shortfalls were simultaneously introduced. According to Pratt & Whitney, the latest issues do not involve engines for the Embraer E2 family and the Bombardier CSeries, but are limited to the Airbus application.

    The exact consequences of the Airbus decision are not yet clear, partly because the spare pool of PW1100G may include an unidentified number of engines that need no modification and can therefore be used. But Airbus has still parked around 30 otherwise completed aircraft at its manufacturing sites in Toulouse and Hamburg awaiting engines.

    Airbus said in a statement that Pratt is “investigating the root cause of this new finding with the full support of Airbus.”

    By: Jens Flottau and Aaron Karp
    Last edited by No Smoking; February 10th, 2018 at 23:39.
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: EASA Emergency AD 2018-0041-E

    ATW Online; Friday 16 February 2018
    Enders: Airbus expects PW1000G fix in April

    Airbus CEO Tom Enders says he is reasonably confident that Pratt & Whitney can find a quick resolution for the latest technical glitch on its PW1100G engine powering the A320neo family, “likely halting Pratt-powered A320neo deliveries.”

    Pratt has told Airbus that it has identified the root cause of the problem, Enders told analysts on Feb. 15 as the company presented its 2017 financial results. The engine manufacturer also committed to deliver the first engines incorporating a fix in April – likely halting A320neo deliveries for more than two months.

    Airbus stopped taking additional PW1100Gs from Pratt and deliveries of Pratt-powered A320neo family aircraft after airlines reported four inflight shutdowns or rejected take-offs within a period of around ten days. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) issued an emergency airworthiness directive essentially banning extended-range twin-engine operations (ETOPS) for the models and grounding eleven aircraft that have two of the faulty engines installed after three additional sectors.

    According to Pratt, an engineering change was made in mid-2017 to improve durability and was introduced in revenue service on customer aircraft in December. But in late January and early February “four of these modified engines did not perform as anticipated,” Pratt conceded. The EASA directive stated the risk of dual inflight engine failure.

    According to Pratt, 43 of the modified engines have already been installed while a further 55 have been delivered to the Airbus final assembly lines. The 43 engines are installed on 32 aircraft.

    Enders stressed that the latest issue means “more work, stress and strain and more disruptions for our customers.” However, he cautioned that the impact on 2018 deliveries is not clear yet and may be smaller than many expect. “Look at what our teams have done in the past year,” he said, referring to earlier changes to the engine and the following recovery effort. “Of course we need engines, but I am confident that our partners will not let us down,” Enders said.

    The Airbus CEO also made clear that Pratt is “not alone” in causing delays. “CFM is behind in [engine] deliveries to us and that is something that needs to be corrected,” Enders said. But he claimed that he has “commitment from the top leadership at GE and Safran that they will do everything they can to fix this.”

    Airbus expects to deliver around 600 single-aisle aircraft in 2018, around 400 of which are planned to be A320neos and A321neos. The 400 aircraft are split roughly evenly between the CFM- and the Pratt-powered variants. Enders said the forecast may be subject to change, subject to Pratt and CFM recovery action.

    By: Jens Flottau
    NS Comment: Fair comment from Airbus about both engine makers. Hope that PW will find a good solution to this latest problem.
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