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Thread: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

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    Default UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    ATW Online; Wednesday 28 November 2018
    US and UK forge Open Skies agreement

    The US and UK have agreed an Open Skies pact that will allow them to continue liberalized air services after the UK leaves the European Union (EU) in March 2019.

    Announcing the new agreement late Nov. 28, UK Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said it would ensure the UK “remains one of the world’s leading aviation hubs after Brexit for both travelers and businesses.”

    Transatlantic commercial passenger and cargo flights between the two countries currently operate within the European Union-US Open Skies agreement. But that will no longer apply from midnight March 29, 2019 when the UK is scheduled to separate from the EU trade bloc following a Brexit referendum in 2016.

    The UK Department for Transport said the new agreement “will guarantee the continuation of the vital transatlantic routes used by tens of millions of passengers a year, ensuring people can continue to travel easily between the UK and US and maintaining choice and good value travel. It also protects our £50 billion trading relationship between our two countries that is supported by air travel.”

    The agreement was welcomed by Willie Walsh, CEO of British Airways’ parent company International Airlines Group.

    “It’s critical that Britain maintains full access to international aviation markets so it can continue to develop its global trading links. This agreement is a significant positive development which we welcome,” Walsh said in a statement.

    “The agreement, which closely follows the model US Open Skies agreement, facilitates strong competition and is clearly pro-consumer. The US is a major destination for British businesses and tourists while the UK welcomes many American visitors to its shores.”

    North American airline lobbying association Airlines 4 America (A4A) also welcomed the deal. “Today’s announcement provides much needed certainty that when the UK exits the European Union there will be no disruption to air service for the traveling and shipping public,” A4A president and CEO Nick Calio said.

    The UK Transport Department also said discussions on a new bilateral air services arrangement with Canada had reached “an advanced stage,” while bilaterals had been concluded with Albania, Georgia, Iceland, Israel, Kosovo, Montenegro, Morocco and Switzerland.

    However, there is much less certainty about how and when the UK will replace its air service rights with other EU countries.


    A non-binding political declaration has been agreed by the UK and EU that calls for an air transport agreement to ensure continued connectivity for airlines within the European trade bloc. The Comprehensive Air Transport Agreement (CATA) would ensure market access and “fair and open competition” for airlines, but there are no details of how or when it would be achieved.

    And there are concerns that a formal withdrawal document agreed by the UK government and the EU on Sunday will be rejected by the UK Parliament, leaving open the possibility of no deal being in place by March 29. Industry observers warn that could lead to considerable air service disruptions.

    By: Karen Walker
    NS Comment: Good moves to ensure stability post 29-March-2019.
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    Default Re: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    ATW Online; Tuesday 04 December 2018
    UK and Canada seal post-Brexit air services pact

    A new agreement between the UK and Canada means air services between the two nations will remain intact following Brexit, the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union (EU).

    The UK is scrambling to put in place bilateral aviation agreements in the run-up to Brexit, scheduled for March 29, 2019. Until now services with Canada have been governed by an EU-wide agreement. The UK-Canada agreement follows a US-UK pact securing post-Brexit transatlantic air services.

    “This new aviation arrangement between the UK and Canada will further strengthen the strong economic and cultural bonds shared between our countries,” UK Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said.

    “International cooperation is essential to a thriving economy and this latest arrangement continues to build momentum for the UK as we leave the EU and take a more prominent position on the world stage,” he said. “Since 2012, the number of passengers traveling between the UK and Canada has been steadily increasing with more than 3.5 million people travelling between the two countries last year.”

    The two nations have an economic relationship that saw goods worth £17.5 billion ($22.3 billion) traded between them last year.

    By: Alan Dron
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    Default Re: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    ATW Online; Wednesday 05 December 2018
    European regional carriers urge EC to clarify post-Brexit landscape

    The European Regions Airline Association (ERA) has urged the European Commission to ensure continuity of services in the aftermath of the UK leaving the European Union (EU), or Brexit, on March 29, 2019.

    The ERA, which represents 50 of Europe’s regional airlines, has written to the Commission highlighting the need to prevent serious harm to European connectivity and urging both sides to reach a solution as soon as possible that will allow airlines to continue operating as they do today.

    Although both the UK and EU have said they want to keep services running post-Brexit, the increasingly messy British political situation—in which Prime Minister Theresa May seems unlikely to get her withdrawal agreement through the UK legislature—has resulted in renewed anxiety among airlines. If no settlement is reached, the UK could crash out of the EU in a “hard Brexit.”

    While for many industries that would mean an automatic reversion to Word Trade Organization (WTO) rules, no such WTO framework exists for the airline sector.

    ERA believes a “no-deal” outcome could have disastrous consequences for the aviation industry, including the grounding of many flights across the EU and the UK. Additionally, the association believes there would be a significant impact on many other areas of aviation, such as air services agreements, aviation safety and security, border management and the environment.

    “Now is the time to definitively confirm a reciprocal comprehensive agreement that protects the established pillars of European aviation,” ERA director general Montserrat Barriga said.

    “ERA’s position on Brexit remains to ensure open and free traffic rights for all EU and UK carriers between the EU and the UK, that EASA regulations continue to apply to UK carriers and that EU and UK carriers can continue to freely lease aircraft to each other.”

    ERA president Andrew Kelly added: “Even if there is a deal, there is a lack of clarity about EU ownership rules that could potentially ground big and small airlines alike, unless there is some form of moratorium. Yet, we get the sense from the politicians and officials that on the morning of March 30, the aviation industry will wake up and go to work as usual, even if there is a hard Brexit. It won’t, it can’t, and the UK and EU need to wake up to that fact now, before it’s too late.”


    By: Alan Dron
    NS Comment: Four nail-biting days to go till we get the vote in Parliament about the PM's deal. Those clamouring against the deal have no ready alternative. Calling for a new "people's vote" referendum may throw up more confusion. If hard-nosed Brexiteers get it, the UK crashes out with no deal. Business leaders are all afraid of a no-deal outcome. If "re-moaners" get their way, rabble rousers may ensure things are disrupted for a long time.

    As for the Northern Ireland matter, a no-deal finale means customs tariffs and checks of some sort. Good Friday Agreement stipulates no hard border between the North and South. Brexiteers want to end free movement. How can that be achieved without physically checking the papers of everyone criss-crossing between the North and South of Ireland?

    Aviation agreements may seem quicker to achieve than the other elements thrown up by Brexit.
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    Default Re: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    Love it total confusion with idiot politicians in the dark the same as everyone else. Current PM completely let down by her so called cabinet supporters. Trying to do the impossible, pleasing the whole of parliament, both left and right. We vote in so called representatives to run the country but end up with a load of hanger oners more interested in their own pay days then even trying to understand the complexities of leaving the EU. My biggest worry would be for the likes of Corbyn and his merry group of narrow minded tunnel vision followers getting into power. Then no doubt we would get his groupies in cabinet positions, even those with no talent whatsoever.
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    Default Re: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    Check out the Bruges lectures on BBC Parliament if you want to see things from the leave side.

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    Default Re: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    Quote Originally Posted by Capetown View Post
    Check out the Bruges lectures on BBC Parliament if you want to see things from the leave side.
    Bruges Group Lectures: https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episod...s-bruges-group
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    Default Re: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    Quote Originally Posted by Capetown View Post
    Check out the Bruges lectures on BBC Parliament if you want to see things from the leave side.
    Could not give a monkeys on what Peter Lilley thinks. End of the day I just want to know if my airline can operate into Europe or not if it so choses. Sure the UK and the EU will have bi laterials sorted for the 29th of March regardless of the outcome.
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    Default Re: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    Tomorrows vote postponed a bit of a PA disaster, which can only make the situation worse. As Joe public just wants a decision.
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    Default Re: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    Quote Originally Posted by Alber Ratman View Post
    Could not give a monkeys on what Peter Lilley thinks. End of the day I just want to know if my airline can operate into Europe or not if it so choses. Sure the UK and the EU will have bi laterials sorted for the 29th of March regardless of the outcome.
    The UK CAA document already provides for various scenarios, including the no-deal outcome. The Bruges Group Lecture mentioned that EASA has softened up from the previous hard-nose stance which existed last September.

    The UK position: https://www.gov.uk/government/public...no-brexit-deal

    Third country operators
    All third country airlines (“third country operators”) require a safety authorisation from the EASA, known as a “Part-TCO Authorisation”. If there’s no deal on EU exit, UK air carriers would become third country operators under EU legislation. Similarly EU operators will become foreign operators under UK legislation.

    All foreign operators flying to the UK would require a safety approval (a UK Part-TCO approval) issued by the CAA before they can operate commercial services to the UK. This certifies that airlines meet international standards and any additional requirements applicable in UK airspace.

    Part-TCO authorisations issued by EASA before 29 March 2019 to airlines outside the EU would remain valid in the UK for up to 2 years after the UK leaves the EU. As EU airlines do not hold EASA issued Part-TCO authorisations they would have to obtain a UK Part-TCO approval from the CAA.


    The CAA will consider each application for a UK Part-TCO authorisation on a case-by-case basis, but in principle, an airline that holds a valid EASA Air Operator Certificate would be considered as having met the qualifying requirements to hold such an approval. The UK would expect this recognition of equivalent safety standards to be reciprocated by the EU in its ‘Part-TCO’ authorisations (see below).

    EASA has yet to provide the details for how and when it would process applications from UK airlines in advance of the UK leaving the EU. The UK however would expect the recognition of equivalent safety standards to be on a reciprocal basis. More information about Part-TCO is available on the EASA website.

    As described in the technical notice on flights to and from the UK, all foreign air carriers, including from the EU, would also require a permit to operate from the CAA (known as a ‘foreign carrier permit’). More information about the process for applying for a foreign carrier permit is available on the CAA website.
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    Default Re: UK Securing Post-Brexit Air Services Agreements

    This should make air travel easier and cheaper for all and should nudge our competitive edge over the remaining EU nations and their "shared" regulatory service. or will we have to add tariffs on EU carriers, to fund our new self regulation?

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